The ‘UP’ Film Series

up SeriesI first discovered this documentary series in 1985 when 28 Up was released in the US. I had never heard of the film but a friend who was working in the industry suggested we see it.

The Up Series is a series of documentary films produced by Granada Television and originally broadcast on the BBC that have followed the lives of fourteen British children since 1964, when they were seven years old. So far the documentary has had nine episodes spanning 56 years (one episode every seven years). The series topped the list of The 50 Greatest Documentaries. The children were selected to represent the range of socio-economic backgrounds in Britain at that time, with the explicit assumption that each child’s social class predetermines their future. Starting in 1964 with Seven Up, The UP Series has explored the Jesuit maxim, “Give me a child until he is seven and I will give you the man.” The original concept was to interview 14 children from diverse backgrounds from all over England, asking them about their lives and their dreams for the future. Every seven years, renowned director Michael Apted, a researcher for Seven Up, has been back to talk to them, examining the progression of their lives.man

JackieSueLynnIt is surprising that only two people have dropped out of the project and one person has died. One gets the impression that the remaining group’s participation is motivated by a mixture of sanguine acceptance, pride and a sense of duty to the project. The group was not meant to represent an entire cross-section of society; Mr. Apted hastily and arbitrarily chose the children from among schools he contacted at the time. There was no intention to continue the project as a series. In retrospect, Mr. Apted regrets the shortsightedness of his decisions, especially the gender imbalance of having only four women. composite

An astonishing, unforgettable look at the structure of life in the 20th century, The UP Series is, according to critic Roger Ebert, “an inspired, almost noble use of the film medium. Apted penetrates to the central mystery of life.” The latest installment, 63 Up, premieres in theaters this week and previous episodes are available on DVD. Rush to see it and binge watch the previous films.

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Tyger Tyger Curated Cosmetic Bags

SS lifestyle 1I’ve been a graphic designer in the beauty industry for 20 years, and in that time I’ve seen a lot of cosmetic bags. So I know a great bag when I see one. And I know that they’re used for much more than just makeup.

That led me to a simple idea: Why not curate my own collection of unique cosmetic bags that change with the seasons, similar to what’s done in the fashion industry. Offer a changing variety of bags to use in any creative way you can dream of.

So I created a website, TygerTygerStore.com, that offers an ever-changing collection of fun, fashionable, and functional bags you’re not likely to see anywhere else. But I only source a limited quantity of each style, so if you see a bag you like, get it now, because when they’re gone, they’re gone! That’s the thrill of the treasure hunt.

This first collection is an eclectic mix of styles for various tastes and is geared toward being great stocking stuffers for the Holidays. All those people on your list… what to get them? Tyger Tyger makes it SO EASY to choose that perfect unique gift for your:

CHILD’S TEACHER  •  HAIRSTYLIST •  BABYSITTER •  BFF •  MOM •  YOGA INSTRUCTOR •  DOG WALKER •  NIECE •  MANICURIST •  SISTER •  CO-WORKER •  WHITE ELEPHANT •  PILATES PARTNER •  PET SITTER •  SECRET SANTA •  HOSTESS GIFT •  NEIGHBOR •  A LAST-MINUTE GIFT •  BOSS •  FRIEND •  …and don’t forget one (or two) for YOU!

ensemble

I know it’s a shameless plug for my new business but they really do make unique, affordable gifts. Visit my website now and check out the selection, plus sign up to get the latest news on upcoming collections. Hint-Hint: Think Pink and April in Paris. TygerTygerStore.com.

 

 

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Do you work for FREE? Stop doing that!

My dentist doesn’t work for free. Neither does my accountant. In fact, if they did I wouldn’t use them. But why? I’d save a lot of money! It’s because I figure if they don’t value what they do enough to charge me for their work, then it isn’t worth it.

To all you young designers out there: when you work for free you reinforce the idea that your work has no value, that your talent deserves little respect. Granted, when you first start out you can’t charge the “big bucks” but you must be compensated fairly for what you do. It has value; if it were so easy then everyone would design their own logos and websites. Oh wait, they sometimes do that…but with dreadful results. Now I’m not talking about pro bono work you may do for your church, your mom or your best friend. Even trading services with other professionals has its place. I’m talking about work you do for clients who need to hire a professional like you and who have the ability to pay fairly for those services.

It’s not an honor to have your name mentioned on a website you spent 60 hours designing for free. The exposure will not generate future work, especially when the next client finds out you did it for free. The “real-world experience” you gain by designing someone’s brochures for free (or for peanuts) benefits no one. It doesn’t benefit you because it robs you of the experience of negotiating a fee for service and the responsibility of delivering a quality product on time for that fee. And, surprisingly, it doesn’t benefit the client either because it teaches them that graphic design services are low-value commodities, thus degrading all design professions. This something-for-nothing attitude is also the reason why I do not believe in design competitions where no one is paid for their work and the winner has the “honor” of having their work chosen and used for free. This too devalues all design professions. And Facebook “likes” don’t pay your rent.

The life of a graphic designer may appear fun and glamorous — sitting around all day drawing pretty pictures and choosing color swatches — but it is a skilled profession requiring a college education, skills using advanced computer programs, an understanding of photography, typography and marketing principles, and a knowledge of the printing process and internet and website functionality. And as a fellow designer, you should see your profession this way, too.

Value what you do and the talent you possess. Don’t work for free.

For a writer’s perspective on working for free, read this excellent article by Hollywood screenwriter Mark Sanderson.

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