Book Review: Archetypes in Branding by Margaret Hartwell and Joshua C. Chen

Archetypes_Cover

I discovered this book at a weekend design seminar in San Diego last year. The moment I picked it up I knew I had struck gold. Any creative working on branding of any kind should have this valuable resource at their side.
Steeped in the psychological theories of Carl Jung, Archetypes in Branding: A Toolkit for Creatives and Strategists by Margaret Hartwell and Joshua C. Chen uses a highly participatory approach to brand development, and combines a companion deck of sixty original archetype cards, in a kit that gives you the tools you need to:

• Reveal your brand’s motivations, how it moves in the world, what its trigger points are and why it attracts certain customers
• Forge relationships with the myriad stakeholders that affect your business
• Empower your team to access their creativity and innovate with integrity

Applying archetypes helps bridge the gap between the cognitive and intuitive sides of the brain and between internal and external business objectives. Archetypes in Branding takes you through a fascinating exploration of the important role archetypes have played in mythology and psychology—and now in business—to resolve brand inconsistencies and enhance trust with all stakeholders.

Author John Howard-Spink defines an archetype as “A universally familiar character or situation that transcends time, place, culture, gender and age. It represents an eternal truth.” This is why George Lucas, when writing the original Star Wars trilogy, consulted with Joseph Campbell, author of the classic work, The Hero With a Thousand Faces, to understand the archetypal characters found in mythic stories. So how does this apply to a brand, say, a household cleaner? You may want to position your product as the hero fighting against dirt and germs, the innocent promising a return to the simple life, or the caregiver nurturing and protecting your family. Each archetype resonates with the customer who identifies with the emotions they elicit.

Unlike many pop psych/marketing books on archetypes, this book provides more comprehensive analyses. It goes beyond the commonly used 12 archetypes to detail dozens of sub-archetypes, which opens up new possibilities for creativity. The book itself is beautifully designed and a pleasure to read. For anyone looking for a way to think about their brand as a story, this book offers great insight and practical application.

Find out more at: archetypesinbranding.com

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Filed under Book Recommendations, Brand Identity, Creativity

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